Arkansas coalition against sexual assault working to still help those who may not get it due to COVID-19

Local News

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — In the month of April, sexual violence organizations saw a decrease in the number of sexual assault cases.

“The statistics show that one in five women are sexually assaulted in the lifetime,” said Monie Johnson, executive director of Arkansas coalition against sexual assault.

“We provide technical assistance and training to all of the services providers who provide advocacy or other kind services to victims of sexual violence,” said Monie Johnson, executive director of Arkansas coalition against sexual assault.

But Johnson fears some victims are not getting the help they need because of COVID-19.

“We’ve seen the numbers drop in the reported cases to the hospitals.” said Monie Johnson, executive director of Arkansas coalition against sexual assault.

Numbers from the Arkansas state crime lab and found the number of sexual assault cases are down from last year. In April of 2019 there were 89 cases this year there was only 52 a difference of 37. 

“Victims don’t feel safe going to the hospital because of the virus and they’ve been told not to come to the hospital if it’s not an emergency but we want victims to know this is an emergency,” said Monie Johnson, executive director of Arkansas coalition against sexual assault.

Secondly, Johnson says sometimes victims don’t feel safe making the call because they’re living with their perpetrator. 

“Most rapes and sexual assaults are committed by an intimate partner or someone that someone knows or living with.” said Monie Johnson, executive director of Arkansas coalition against sexual assault.

So far for the month of May the state crime lab reports 36 cases. We spoke to director Kermit Channell through facetime. 

“What’s equally as important is providing those survivors of sexual assault information where they need to get help all the things that the victims might need,” said Kermit B. channel, director Arkansas state crime laboratory department of public safety. 

Johnson says victims only have 96 hours to get their kits performed so they can collect physical evidence. 

“Some is that goes away after you shower or take a bath.” said Monie Johnson, executive director of Arkansas coalition against sexual assault.

Johnson says a lot of the crisis centers have set up chats, so victims can communicate through Facebook. 

Copyright 2020 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Don't Miss

More Don't Miss

Trending Stories

Trending Stories