Komen Arkansas urges importance of early detection in reducing breast cancer mortality rates

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LITTLE ROCK, Ark.- The disease Wendy Anderson battled so publicly is something that impacts many Arkansans.

According to Susan G. Komen Arkansas more and more young women are being diagnosed with breast cancer and Arkansas is the sixth worst state for breast cancer mortality.

“It just reminds us how important our fight against breast cancer really is,” says Amy Treadway, executive director of Komen Arkansas.

Through Wendy’s journey her husband ASU Coach Blake Anderson posted Twitter updates of her battle and the couple stayed very involved with Susan G. Komen and its cause.

“She had a really nasty case,” says Treadway. “It was triple negative metastatic which means that it did travel throughout her body. It makes us very sad.”

Amidst their grief their mission is the same, to save more lives.

In 2016 Susan G. Komen started the bold goal, to reduce breast cancer mortality by 50% by 2026 nationally.

The key to doing that is early detection, but in Arkansas that can be a challenge.

“We have 26 counties in the state that do not have any kind of fixed mammography facility,” says Treadway, “so that’s a barrier for women to get a mammogram.”

On top of that funds are down for the state.

“We need those funds to be able to get that mammo-van out into these rural communities where women can’t take off work,” says Kristin Trulock, Development director for Susan G. Komen Arkansas. “[For} single mamas that don’t have the funds or the insurance to get these mammograms.”

“We just have to continue to raise funds, to research to try to find better cures, better treatments, so that people just don’t go through what Wendy went through,” says Treadway.

To join fundraising efforts click here >> https://komenarkansas.org/get-involved/fundraise/

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