AR Executions Recap: What Jack Jones Did to Land on Death Row

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BALD KNOB, Ark. – Jack Jones is one of two inmates scheduled to be put to death Monday night, April 24, in what will be Arkansas’ first double-execution since 1999.
 
As Jones lives out his final day, we recall how his victim lived out hers… 
 
“I don’t want to live another day knowing he’s alive,” Lacey Phillips, the daughter of Jack Jones’ victim, said.
 
On June 6, 1995, Lacey, then only 11 years old, was with her mom, Mary, at her accounting office in Bald Knob when Jack Jones robbed them.
 
Jones raped and murdered Mary. She was found nude from the waist down, beaten and bruised, with a cord from a coffee pot wrapped around her neck.
 
Lacey was Jones’ attempted second murder victim. He beat her and left her for dead. She was unconscious when police arrived.
 
In 1996, Jones was convicted of capital murder, rape and criminal attempt to commit murder, at which point he was sentenced to death.
 
“It’s ridiculous that we have had to live our whole life like this,” Lacey said, of waiting for Jones’ sentence to be carried out. “21 years later and he’s still here.”
 
During the past two decades on death row, Jones has been riddled with a series of medical issues, including diabetes which caused him to lose one of his legs.
 
He and his attorney argue all of the medication he’s on could render the lethal injection drugs useless. 
 
Jeff Rosenzweig, Jones’ attorney, read a letter from Jones after he waived his most recent clemency hearing. The letter read, in part, “Know too that I have suffered at times tremendously. I have been in pain since day one and subconsciously I’m told I have continually sabotaged my healing out of guilt, feeling that I’m not deserving.”
 
Jones’ words made it clear he’s never wanted clemency nor felt that he deserved forgiveness. 
 
“Your wish is and always has been that I die and I could never ever deny you this,” Jones’ letter continued. 
 
This is an end Lacey says she has waited more than two decades for. 
 
“I heard eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth, and I think it’s time,” Lacey said. 

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