3-D Technology Helps with Eye Surgeries

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LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – UAMS is now using 3-D technology to better perform eye surgeries.

The hospital recently acquired the machine that allows an active image to be projected on the television during surgery.

When the operating team puts on a special set of glasses the image becomes three dimensional.

“We can do a scan like an x-ray of the retina as we operate. So we have it 3D so its like you are inside the eye watching everything,” explained Ophthalmologist Dr. Ahmed Sallam.

Dr. Sallam says not only does it improve the quality of surgery but it is also a great way to teach future surgeons.

“Being able to actually feel the depth perception and be able to understand what he is talking about and what he is explaining through the surgery is astounding,” said Medical Student Hunter Bane.

Prior to this technology, Doctors had to look through a small microscope while performing these eye surgeries. Now all they have to do is look up at the screen.

Copyright 2019 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Aaron Nolan is a morning show co-host in Little Rock, Arkansas with Nexstar Media Group's KARK-TV. He has a passion for social media and makes it an important part of his daily routine. Click here to read Aaron's full bio.


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